10 SENSORY TUBS FOR 3 YEAR OLDS




Brain Development in the Pre-K and K Years

During pre-school and Kindergarten, the brain grows steadily, increasing from seventy percent to ninety percent of its eventual adult weight. In addition to gains in size, the brain undergoes considerable reshaping and refining. Among these modifications are profound changes in the frontal lobes-areas of the brain devoted to regulating thought and action. The frontal lobes govern the inhibition of impulse, orderly memory, and the integration of information- capacities that facilitate reasoning and problem solving. All these skills improve considerably in kindergarten children.

How To Make Your Wife Happy In 5 Minutes A Day

1. When you get home, ask, “What can I do to help?” Then for at least five minutes, actually do what she says. A lot of people ask this question and then do half of the job. So, the job is set the table, and they take out some plates. Or the job is diaper the baby, and they leave the wipes and the cream open and an empty bag of diapers laying around. Only five minutes is necessary for many household related tasks, or five minutes could make a good dent. At the very least, for five minutes your wife will see you fully engaged in a task, and not sitting doing nothing (which women hate), and that will magically make her happy and less stressed out.

2. Tell your wife what she does that you appreciate. For five whole minutes, tell her what she does that makes you happy and feel appreciative and grateful. Five minutes is a long time to talk, and you’ll see that this can make a real positive impact on your wife’s feelings. She may look at you with a smile like she did when you were dating. Or a more tired version of it at least.

3. Send your wife an email about how much you love her. No logistics, no plans, just a love letter. Women love this stuff. Most of them. If you try it and it doesn’t have any happiness impact, then next time try the next one...

4. Go on Amazon or Etsy and take five minutes to buy your wife a little surprise present. This doesn’t take very long.

5. When you want to have sex, look into your wife’s eyes and tell her how much you want her and how sexy she is. Use SPECIFICS. Do this for five minutes. This is longer than most men take, by a power of 1 million. Because, let’s face it, the usual is, “You’re so hot,” or no words at all, and then onto the kissing, if not the main event. Five minutes of saying how much you desire your wife and WHY is five minutes more than she may have heard in a while.

6 ways to prepare your toddler for the dentist + check-up

1. Get the timing right: Make your tot’s appointment for a time when they’re alert and rested.

2. Parent by example: Mums and dads have the greatest influence on their tyke’s dental health. Your child will pick up on your anxiety, so focus on staying cool, calm, collected and confident.

3. No surprises: Bambinos handle dental procedures best when their parents know what to expect and have prepared them for the experience.

4. Look on the bright side: Answer your tot’s questions in a positive way. For example, use words like ‘healthy’ instead of ‘hurt’ and definitely steer clear of scary dental anecdotes!

5. Come prepared: Take along some questions about your child’s oral health.

6. Over to them! When the big day arrives, give your mini-mite some control over their dental visit, such as choosing their own ‘tooth doctor outfit’. Then it’s time to climb into the exciting dentist’s chair and let the check-up begin!

10 Things NOT to Say to the Breastfeeding Mom of a Toddler

People have a lot of opinions about breastfeeding in general, but they have even more to say about extended breastfeeding. Nevermind that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends nursing throughout a baby's first year (and for as long afterward as both the mother and child want to continue) or that the World Health Organization suggests breastfeeding for at least two years—to some onlookers (including friends and family), nursing a toddler is just plain weird.

20 Things To Say To Your Child Instead Of “Don’t Cry”

We don’t always appreciate it when our children begin to cry, but what they are actually doing is making use of the body’s innate recovery system. When we get hurt, physically or emotionally, instead of storing it all up in our bodies as tension, we can make use of crying, laughter, raging or trembling. This is how the body processes and releases feelings. Most of us don’t do this often, having being told “Don’t cry” since we were small, but our children still have their recovery system intact.

Secondhand smoke causes antisocial and aggressive behavior in kids

Secondhand smoke isn’t just bad for your kids’ health. According to a recent study, exposure to household tobacco smoke in early childhood can also cause behavioral problems, The Mirror reports.

Researchers from the University of Montreal have found a link between exposure to antisocial behavior, which is “characterized by proactive intent to harm others, lack prosocial feelings, and violate social norms.” This can manifest in the following...

This Is What Screen Time Really Does to Kids' Brains

Screen time is an inescapable reality of modern childhood, with kids of every age spending hours upon hours in front of iPads, smartphones and televisions. That’s not always a bad thing: Educational apps and TV shows are great ways for children to sharpen their developing brains and hone their communication skills—not to mention the break these gadgets provide harried parents. But tread carefully: A number of troubling studies connect delayed cognitive development in kids with extended exposure to electronic media. The US Department of Health and Human Services estimates that American children spend a whopping seven hours a day in front of electronic media. Other statistics reveal that kids as young as two regularly play iPad games and have playroom toys that involve touch screens.

Should We All Be Raising Gender-Neutral Kids?

After the birth of my daughter, FaceTime conversations with my mother or my mother-in-law usually consist of a lot of cooing. “How’s my little princess doing today?” one of them will ask my five-month-old. “She looks like such a beautiful doll today,” the other will say. After ending a recent call, my husband came up to me and asked if we could please tell the grandmothers to stop referring to our daughter as a princess or a doll. “All dolls and princesses have to do is sit and look pretty,” he said. “Is that the kind of message you want her to grow up with?”