8 SIGNS OF A SENSITIVE KID AND WHY IT'S ACTUALLY A GOOD THING




My Parenting Style: Survivalist

To me, the definition is simple. While most of the time I try to raise my kids in a nurturing, educationally rich, nutritiously sound environment, sometimes, the s*@# just hits the fan (or, more likely, my most expensive rug). And when temper tantrums, fevers, or general fussiness is the order of the day, all bets are off . . . and the cartoons come on. And I am totally, 100 percent OK with that. So how do you become a survivalist mom? Here's my handy guide to my "whatever gets you through the day" philosophy.

15-Year-Old Sushma Verma, Daughter Of A Sanitation Worker, Is India's Youngest PhD Student

In a country where more than 35 per cent of girls are discouraged from studying and going to school, young prodigy Sushma Verma from Lucknow has a different story to tell! At age 7 when most of us were barely able to dedicate 30 minutes to studying, Sushma had already completed her 10th. At the young age of 13, she had enrolled herself in college and was getting her Master’s Degree in Microbiology from Lucknow University.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Beach Safety

As early as possible, Leatherman says, elementary age kids “should learn what to do in the water, how to swim and how to float.” And as kids are getting comfortable in the water, parents can encourage them to think about safety at the beach. One place to start: what do kids themselves feel cautious about? Parents may be surprised to learn kids are feeling leery of sea creatures, or bothered by the sun, and take the opportunity to talk more about sharing the water with wildlife, or the importance of sunscreen—as well as getting across the absolute basics of beach safety: young kids shouldn’t go into deep water, and should always stay near their parents or a lifeguard.

All The Ways Parents Enable Bratty Kids And What Can Be Done To Fix It

Elaine Rose Glickman, parent and author of Your Kid’s A Brat, And It’s All Your Fault, says that a kid’s shitty behavior, at least partially, comes from the ones that made them.

“Most people have a sense of when their child has gone off the rails, and lot of times we deny it and we try to push it down,” says Glickman. It’s completely natural for a kid to test the limits, but when it becomes behavioral pattern, that’s when they’ve crossed the line into brattiness, and it’s up to you to do more than just dismiss it as a tantrum or a phase. “Some things we overlook or explain away are behaviors we need to deal with.” So how should we deal with?

1. To Be A Parent, You Have to Actually BE A Parent
2. “It’s Just A Phase” Is BS
3. The Whining Has to Stop
4. Limit Their Options
5. Let Them Be Mad Sometimes
6. Mind Their Manners

How A Single Mum Juggles 4 Businesses & 2 Kids

Munas Van Boonstra runs four businesses simultaneously, while gracefully juggling life as a single mother to two adorable children. Her businesses include an events planning company, Nasty Inc; an events furniture & props rental company, Event Rental Malaysia; Gingerbread Haus, a line of children’s clothing she’s started with her kids, and her latest venture being Supermumpreneur, a women & mum’s university where she teaches women how to do it all and entrepreneurship.

Four Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Ignore or Punish Toddler Tantrums

Popular parenting wisdom advises dealing with toddler tantrums in one of two ways. Ignore the ‘attention seeking behaviour’ and reward the toddler when they are good, or discipline the toddler by punishing them through exclusion. The naughty step and time out are commonplace in millions of homes around the world. Do they really work though? Child psychology and neuroscience says otherwise. Here are four reasons why you may want to reconsider your response the next time your toddler has a tantrum.