HELP! MY CHILD IS LYING: TEACHING KIDS ABOUT HONESTY & TELLING THE TRUTH




Managing Your Own Emotions: The Key to Positive, Effective Parenting

Parenting young children (really children of any age) is an intensely emotional experience. There is the pure pleasure of cuddling, playing, laughing, exploring, and delighting in your baby’s daily growth and discoveries. And then there are the challenges—the moments of stress, anger, frustration, and resentment—at not knowing what a baby’s cry means and how to calm her, at the totally irrational demands of a toddler, or at the aggressive behavior of an older child toward a new baby...

How to Deal With the Never Ending Questions from Your Kids

We all know that children are naturally inquisitive. We also know their inquiry sometimes manifests itself in annoying ways or at inopportune times, “Are we there yet?” or “Is that lady having a baby?” being among the most common examples.

Our culture inundates us with examples of parents losing their cool with inquiring youngsters, from Al Bundy to Homer Simpson. In malls and grocery stores across the country, mothers and fathers are telling their little ones to stop asking, be quiet, or shut up.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Beach Safety

As early as possible, Leatherman says, elementary age kids “should learn what to do in the water, how to swim and how to float.” And as kids are getting comfortable in the water, parents can encourage them to think about safety at the beach. One place to start: what do kids themselves feel cautious about? Parents may be surprised to learn kids are feeling leery of sea creatures, or bothered by the sun, and take the opportunity to talk more about sharing the water with wildlife, or the importance of sunscreen—as well as getting across the absolute basics of beach safety: young kids shouldn’t go into deep water, and should always stay near their parents or a lifeguard.

10 Simple Tips To Boost Your Toddler’s Memory

The first few years of a child’s life are crucial for their cognitive development, also known as the formative years, whereby neural connections are being made and the brain is “wired”. The first 3 years of life have been identified by neuroscientists and developmental psychologists as important for domains such as early language and joint attention. The brain has many functions and interestingly, studies have shown that “attention control” and “working memory” are two faculties that largely develop after birth. The ability to choose the right information to focus on, and thereafter retain it, is important for learning.

Secondhand smoke causes antisocial and aggressive behavior in kids

Secondhand smoke isn’t just bad for your kids’ health. According to a recent study, exposure to household tobacco smoke in early childhood can also cause behavioral problems, The Mirror reports.

Researchers from the University of Montreal have found a link between exposure to antisocial behavior, which is “characterized by proactive intent to harm others, lack prosocial feelings, and violate social norms.” This can manifest in the following...

Raising Royal Babies: How Prince William and Kate Middleton Raise Prince George and Princess Charlotte

Prince George and Princess Charlotte may come from a royal family in the United Kingdom. However, their royalty parents, Prince William and Kate Middleton do not want both royal babies to receive the impeccable royal treatment. Even though they have inherited a number of luxury bedroom spreads around Kensington Palace in London, their royal parents prefer to treat them as average children.

As a result, Prince William takes on the responsibility to go on a 10-mile journey to pick up his son from pre-school. George who is now 2 years old has begun his study at East Walton's Westacre Montessori School for a 3 days a week program. This set up, makes Prince George converse better and improve his social skills by being around other pre-school students. This successfully eliminates the gap between the son of Royal Prince and the average regular student.

According to US Magazine, Prince William and Kate Middleton like to take care of their children by themselves without special assistance. "I very much feel if I can do it myself, I want to do it myself", Prince William explained after the birth of George 2 years ago.