Why We Should Stop Blaming Disney Princesses For Gender Behavior And Body Image Issues On Young Girls

"It's time to stop princess shaming. There are thousands of gendered messages my little girl absorbs every day: the way I curse how my pants fit, the way shopkeepers talk to her, the way teachers assume that I am the dominant caregiver," Vardanis wrote. "There are so many battles to be fought, but princesses with sparkly tiaras may be the least of our worries."

Perhaps the best way to lessen the negative effects of the Disney princess culture to young girls is to expose them to all things in moderation, Time reports. Disney also made an effort in redesigning its Disney Princess collection by introducing braver, "more empowered" and "less boy-crazy" princesses such as Merida of "Brave" and Elsa of "Frozen."

10 Key Things You Should Not Do In Front Of Your Children

We know there are many habits and routines that we don’t want our children to pick up but yet we are not setting good life model or example to them. You may be thinking and saying that you do not want your child to smoke, to munch on titbits, to curse and swear because you know it totally uncool, yet our actions tell the opposite. What you did not know is that, these children learn from watching what their parents do. So always remember, your kids are always watching you.

Play and Learn: 4 Ways to Deal with A Curious Toddler in the House

It never fails: You take just a two-minute bathroom break, and by the time you’re done your toddler has emptied his toy box across the living-room floor, ripped your magazines to shreds, and somehow gotten into the crisper drawer of the fridge. “Toddlers learn by exploring their environment with all five senses,” says Alexis Clyde, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at Children’s Medical Center Dallas. Kids this age are particularly fascinated by how an object works and what happens when they bend, drop, or throw it. While your child’s inquiries are normal, it’s no fun having your house constantly look like a wreck. We’ll help you contain the chaos by controlling his behavior without suppressing his inquisitiveness.


No parent (that I’ve ever met) would ever dream of teaching their child that rape is okay. But every day, in many different ways, well-meaning parents contribute to rape culture, and our kids suffer for it.
As moms and dads, we probably don’t talk directly about rape to kids, at least not until they’re older. But we’re still sending messages about sex and consent all the time. Because of that, we need to make sure we’re not teaching them some very dangerous lessons, even if just by accident.

Teach Your Kid How To Read With Interest, Not What Books To Read

Your child may read every book in the world but if he/she doesn't understand a word, it only accounts for wasted time you could have used for a more productive activity. For you, we simplified it down to five tips so you can follow through easily and apply it to your child rearing.

1. Know The Way Your Kid Thinks.
2. Teach Your Child The Art Of Conversation.
3. Give Your Kid Books That He/She Will Understand.
4. Know The Content That Peaks Your Kid's Interest.
5. Let Your Kid's Mind Float Away Every Once In A While.

This Is What Screen Time Really Does to Kids' Brains

Screen time is an inescapable reality of modern childhood, with kids of every age spending hours upon hours in front of iPads, smartphones and televisions. That’s not always a bad thing: Educational apps and TV shows are great ways for children to sharpen their developing brains and hone their communication skills—not to mention the break these gadgets provide harried parents. But tread carefully: A number of troubling studies connect delayed cognitive development in kids with extended exposure to electronic media. The US Department of Health and Human Services estimates that American children spend a whopping seven hours a day in front of electronic media. Other statistics reveal that kids as young as two regularly play iPad games and have playroom toys that involve touch screens.

Teach your Child to Express Emotions Positively

Let’s face it – no matter how “angelic” you think your children are, there will be times in your life as a parent when you’ll find yourself dealing with your kids’ annoying behavior; attempting to calm them down when you won’t buy what they want; and feeling helpless when they start “acting out” or throwing tantrums.

Although there are several tried-and-tested ways on how to deal with such episodes, parents may also want to know how to teach their children to “channel” or refocus their negative emotions, so that they can avoid the dreaded tantrums in the first place.