PARENTS, IT'S TIME TO STOP UNDERMINING OUR KIDS' TEACHERS




5 Ways To Use Magnetic Letters & Free Printables

I love magnetic letters and I recently bought myself some lowercase magnets and decided to create some printables to use as mats to place over cookie sheets and turn them into wonderful magnetic free choice activities. Lowercase letter magnets are so versatile and no matter what level your child is at I have a printable or two that will work perfectly. But before I link the free printables I want to share with you some of the benefits of using these manipulatives in your class or homeschool program

These 10 Books Without Words Turn You Into The Master Storyteller At Bedtime

If a picture is really worth a thousand words, then you read the equivalent of War & Peace in board books every night. It’s no secret that kids go for big, bright, visual stories. And, fortunately for you, these award-winning picture books are 99 percent word-free and a lot more fun than Tolstoy.
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It also provides a great opportunity for you to put your creative stamp on things. Let the illustrators provide the brilliant artwork, universal themes, and general plot — you fill in the details. Of course, even toddlers who can barely say their ABCs know that you’re improvising most of it — but at least you’re enthusiastic.

8 Signs Of a Sensitive Kid and Why It's Actually a Good Thing

Many parents can relate to tears and hurt feelings during childhood but for those with a sensitive child, they are likely presented with these strong feelings much more often. Parents of sensitive children observe their little ones worrying more deeply about what others around them think and being more emotionally reactive. However, these kiddos also tend to make amazing friends because they are so intuitive and are able to easily empathize with others.

10 Things NOT to Say to the Breastfeeding Mom of a Toddler

People have a lot of opinions about breastfeeding in general, but they have even more to say about extended breastfeeding. Nevermind that the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends nursing throughout a baby's first year (and for as long afterward as both the mother and child want to continue) or that the World Health Organization suggests breastfeeding for at least two years—to some onlookers (including friends and family), nursing a toddler is just plain weird.