TEACHER USES LEGOS TO EXPLAIN MATH TO SCHOOLCHILDREN




What It’s Like When Your Kid Is A Chatterbox

When the time came for my daughter to string sentences together, she never stopped. She talked and talked, and when she ran out of stuff to say, well, she just made noises. These days, my daughter always has a thought to share or observations to vocalize. From the time she’s up to the time she’s fast asleep, there are few quiet moments in between without thoughts, ideas, out-loud play, questions, or commentary. Having a talkative kid has its pros and cons, as anyone with a chatterbox will know.

Falls: What to do when a baby or toddler gets a bump on the head

Whenever your baby or toddler takes a serious tumble — from a couch, bed, highchair, crib, or countertop, for example — you'll need to do a thorough check for injuries, especially if he falls on his head or back.

You'll want to make sure that your child doesn't have any serious wounds, that he hasn't broken any bones, and that he hasn't suffered a concussion or other internal damage, including a serious head injury (such as a skull fracture or intracranial injury). Falls can be serious, but baby and toddler bones are soft, so they don't fracture as easily as those of an older child.

Teach Your Kid How To Read With Interest, Not What Books To Read

Your child may read every book in the world but if he/she doesn't understand a word, it only accounts for wasted time you could have used for a more productive activity. For you, we simplified it down to five tips so you can follow through easily and apply it to your child rearing.

1. Know The Way Your Kid Thinks.
2. Teach Your Child The Art Of Conversation.
3. Give Your Kid Books That He/She Will Understand.
4. Know The Content That Peaks Your Kid's Interest.
5. Let Your Kid's Mind Float Away Every Once In A While.

Navigating Your Identity as a Parent and an Educator

Tips for Parent-Educators: These are the top things I wish someone had said to me as I offered my first born to his first school.

1. Be a parent, first and foremost. That's what your kid needs most from you.
2. Proactively build a relationship with your child's teacher at the beginning of the year. Don't wait until there's a problem to sit down with them.
3. If a teacher doesn't ask about your child's strengths and interests, share those.
4. Also share anything you think the teacher should know about your kid that would help them be effective, such as that your kid is an introvert and won't often participate in whole-class discussions. (Again, hopefully they ask this question, but if not, share it.)
5. If your child complains about being bored, class being too hard, not being treated well by peers or adults, listen to your child. Don't hope it'll get better. Go to school and talk to people. Observe classes.
6. Don't be afraid of talking to the principal. Don't be afraid of making requests. You can do this kindly and thoughtfully, but your job, again, is to advocate for your kid.

How To Raise A Digitally Savvy Kid That Isn’t Always Staring At A Scree

Your kid is part of a whole generation that can swipe right before they can write. And because of that fact, you’ve become a little paranoid with how they interact with technology. It’s one thing to curb screentime, cut off the Wi-Fi, or investigate the feasibility of becoming Amish. But instead of taking their tech away (or just running away), why not just teach them how to use all of it responsibly and for their benefit?

Everything You Need To Know This Week About Being A Parent

This week in parenting you learned that the reason your kid trusts you might have something to do with you being really, really ridiculously good looking. But if your good looks aren’t exactly translating in the bedroom, a statistician thinks Game Of Thrones is to blame for your lack of literal game. Parents of thumbsuckers and nail biters were given reason to rejoice, because their kids might have fewer allergies later in life. Plus you found out what the hell Pokémon Go is, and while it’s no Nintendo NES Classic Edition, at least it will get you kid outside. All this news and more, because every week is busy when you’re a parent.

Children on board: 5 safety tips for parents travelling with kids in cars and cabs

According to a 2002 Traffic Police campaign which advocated the importance of belting up, a properly fitted child restraint system can reduce fatal injuries by up to 75 per cent and serious injuries by 67 per cent.
Here are some safety tips for parents:
1) It's illegal for anyone under the height of 1.35M, regardless of age to be unsecured
2) Make sure children are secured in a restraint appropriate for their age, height & weight
3) Have your children seated at the back & try to avoid placing child seats in front....

Mom’s viral message gets real about struggles of parenthood

Storm-Manea Ellyatt is calling bull on the facade of parenthood displayed on social media. Instead of posting a highlight reel of her life, she’s getting real about the daily struggles she faces as a mother — and she invites everyone to join her.

“All those cute bonds ads, miniature Nike shoes, adorable baby shower gifts, baby spam on Instagram, squad dates with your mum posse and those god damn laceylaners lied to me,” she wrote on Thursday, listing her failed expectations about parenting based on how it’s conveyed by ads, TV and online.

“Not once did I see an ad with a mum locked in her cupboard crying in her leaked stained pjs from 3 days ago, covered in sweat and vomit, praying to every god imaginable for the strength and patience to go back to the s**tshow that is now their life,” she wrote. “The once calm, poised, patient goddess, who could sling cocktials, swear with sailors and dance uninhibited until tomorrow afternoon, can bearly hold a conversation, hold her eyes open or the tears back from this new found ‘bliss.’”