TEXAS SCHOOL TRIPLES RECESS TIME AND SEES IMMEDIATE POSITIVE RESULTS IN KIDS




Screentime Is Making Kids Moody, Crazy and Lazy

Children or teens who are “revved up” and prone to rages or—alternatively—who are depressed and apathetic have become disturbingly commonplace. Chronically irritable children are often in a state of abnormally high arousal, and may seem “wired and tired.” That is, they’re agitated but exhausted. Because chronically high arousal levels impact memory and the ability to relate, these kids are also likely to struggle academically and socially.

6 WAYS WE (ACCIDENTALLY) TEACH OUR KIDS RAPE CULTURE

No parent (that I’ve ever met) would ever dream of teaching their child that rape is okay. But every day, in many different ways, well-meaning parents contribute to rape culture, and our kids suffer for it.
As moms and dads, we probably don’t talk directly about rape to kids, at least not until they’re older. But we’re still sending messages about sex and consent all the time. Because of that, we need to make sure we’re not teaching them some very dangerous lessons, even if just by accident.

What All Moms of Boys Need to Know

I am a Boy Mom.

I remember thinking during the gender ultrasound of my second baby that it was certainly a girl (after all, I always dreamed of having one of both genders), and then the technician said, “It’s a boy!”.

Strangely enough, my first thought was “I get to be the Mom of 2 BOYS!!” I was so excited. I love my oldest son, and was so excited to have another boy to love.

As much as I love little boys, there are some things that are unique to raising them.

Yes, there is penis talk, fart jokes, and dirt but there’s so much more about boys that every expecting Boy Mom needs to know.

'Tough Love' Parenting for Baby Boys Can Do More Harm Than Good

Baby boys don’t need to be “toughened up” by letting them cry or intentionally withholding your affection. In fact, doing so can lead to harmful consequences, says a recently published research review.

According to the research review published in Infant Mental Health Journal, baby boys are more vulnerable to stress due to “significant gender differences…between male and female social and emotional functions in the earliest stages of development.”