TODDLERS’ SCREEN TIME LINKED TO SLOWER SPEECH DEVELOPMENT, STUDY FNDS




How to Talk to Your Kids About Beach Safety

As early as possible, Leatherman says, elementary age kids “should learn what to do in the water, how to swim and how to float.” And as kids are getting comfortable in the water, parents can encourage them to think about safety at the beach. One place to start: what do kids themselves feel cautious about? Parents may be surprised to learn kids are feeling leery of sea creatures, or bothered by the sun, and take the opportunity to talk more about sharing the water with wildlife, or the importance of sunscreen—as well as getting across the absolute basics of beach safety: young kids shouldn’t go into deep water, and should always stay near their parents or a lifeguard.

If You Thought Terrible Twos Were Bad Experts Say the ‘Threenager’ Is Way Worse!

Every parent or parent to-be has heard of the 'terrible two' phase but as someone who has been there four times, I can tell you that the twos are nothing compared to the age of three! At two they can be whiny and a bit defiant, but at three they can actually talk a bit more and it seems their attitude is beginning to fully develop!It seems that experts are now agreeing that while those two year old's are getting a bad rap, it's really the 'threenager' that parents need to be wary of!

Should We All Be Raising Gender-Neutral Kids?

After the birth of my daughter, FaceTime conversations with my mother or my mother-in-law usually consist of a lot of cooing. “How’s my little princess doing today?” one of them will ask my five-month-old. “She looks like such a beautiful doll today,” the other will say. After ending a recent call, my husband came up to me and asked if we could please tell the grandmothers to stop referring to our daughter as a princess or a doll. “All dolls and princesses have to do is sit and look pretty,” he said. “Is that the kind of message you want her to grow up with?”

Top 7 Summer Diseases in Children & How To Prevent It

Tips to prevent common summer diseases among kids:

1. Ensure that your child drinks liquids from time to time so that he doesn’t get dehydrated. Fresh fruit juices are preferable to colas and other packaged drinks. It would help if he carried a few of his favorite beverages with him.
2. You and your child should maintain the highest level of hygiene and cleanliness at home and wherever else you might go.
3. Put him on a diet of rich in fibers, water-based fruits like water melon, minerals and vegetables.
4. Do not give him cut veggies and fruits or street food that may be spicy, cooked a long time ago, spicy and oily.
5. Dress your child in loose and lightweight cottons. Ensure that he wears a cap when he’s outdoors and uses sunscreen on the exposed parts of his body.
6. Keep him indoors during the hottest parts of the day, i.e. 10am to 2pm.
7. Keep him out of crowded areas and away from the direct glare of the sun.

These 10 Books Without Words Turn You Into The Master Storyteller At Bedtime

If a picture is really worth a thousand words, then you read the equivalent of War & Peace in board books every night. It’s no secret that kids go for big, bright, visual stories. And, fortunately for you, these award-winning picture books are 99 percent word-free and a lot more fun than Tolstoy.
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It also provides a great opportunity for you to put your creative stamp on things. Let the illustrators provide the brilliant artwork, universal themes, and general plot — you fill in the details. Of course, even toddlers who can barely say their ABCs know that you’re improvising most of it — but at least you’re enthusiastic.

My Parenting Style: Survivalist

To me, the definition is simple. While most of the time I try to raise my kids in a nurturing, educationally rich, nutritiously sound environment, sometimes, the s*@# just hits the fan (or, more likely, my most expensive rug). And when temper tantrums, fevers, or general fussiness is the order of the day, all bets are off . . . and the cartoons come on. And I am totally, 100 percent OK with that. So how do you become a survivalist mom? Here's my handy guide to my "whatever gets you through the day" philosophy.